U.S. patterns for recurrent coronary heart disease examined

From 2008 to 2017, the rates of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD) events, heart failure hospitalization, and mortality declined in the year after MI, with greater reductions seen for women than men, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of Circulation.

Sanne A.E. Peters, Ph.D., from Imperial College London, and colleagues examined the rates of recurrent CHD events among 770,408 U.S. women and 700,477 U.S. men with MI hospitalization between 2008 and 2017.

During 2008 to 2017, the researchers found decreases for women and men, respectively, in the age-standardized recurrent MI rates, from 89.2 to 72.3 per 1,000 person-years and 94.2 to 81.3, respectively (multivariable-adjusted P interaction by sex < 0.001); in recurrent CHD event rates, from 166.3 to 133.3 and from 198.1 to 176.8 (P interaction < 0.001); in heart failure hospitalization rates, from 177.4 to 158.1 and from 162.9 to 156.1 (P interaction = 0.001); and in all-cause mortality rates, from 403.2 to 389.5 and from 436.1 to 417.9 (P interaction = 0.82). Comparing women with men, the multivariable-adjusted rate ratios (95 percent confidence intervals) in 2017 were 0.90 (0.86 to 0.93), 0.80 (0.78 to 0.82), 0.99 (0.96 to 1.01), and 0.82 (0.80 to 0.83) for recurrent MI, recurrent CHD events, heart failure hospitalization, and all-cause mortality, respectively.

“Rates remain very high, and sex differences persist, with higher rates of recurrent CHD events and death among men than women,” the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Amgen, which partially funded the study.